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javelin

“Brooklyn-via-Providence duo Javelin, who mention being influenced by junk shops, flea markets, endless loop tapes, regional dance music, local partying, and New Edition.” -stereogum

“[Jamz n Jemz]…a CD-R they’ve been distributing at gigs, is flecked with brilliant little vignettes– almost every one a gem, many of them certifiable jams– that argue for the notion of a million little pieces coming together to make something much larger / …never letting their listener get too close to an idea or a groove for very long.” p4k

JAVELIN: A new addition to David Byrne’s Luaka Bop label. “Sounds range from broken dance jams to relaxed instrumental cut-ups, created with love on their MPCs. Long forgotten samples are chopped and re-assembled with drums, wooden recorders, old keyboards, handmade thumb pianos or whatever instruments are readily at hand. The result is a kind of mix tape fantasy (residing in the mythical “dollar bins of the future”), where R & B impresarios, amateur booty bass producers and Andean flautists hold equal sway.” OUR STAGE

funk / idm / electronica

“Vibert helped to redefine the rules of electronic music in the UK in the early to mid ’90s – alongside a bunch of reprehensible mates that included Richard D. James (a.k.a. Aphex Twin), Tom Jenkinson (Squarepusher), Mike Paradinas (µ-Ziq), Chris Jeffs (Cylob), and the labels Rephlex and Warp”

vibert_luke_rhythm
“A pretty sweet set from the man of many names, club groove beat legend Luke Vibert! Rhythm has a lot of spacey soul jazz inspired sounds in the mix, and beats the roll from a laidback hip hop style more of sparse groove — kind of a slow rolling groove rather than a fill the club floor sound — a sample based, borderline hip hop instrumentals style set”

Luke Vibert – Rhythm (2009)

vibert-we-hear-you
“The title track shows off his ability to create something so hypnotically cool out of such simple lines and hooks that you’ll believe old skool hip-hop is British” / “He mixes up genres and EFX across the 14 tracks; hip-hop vs. Acid, experimental electronic vs. dubstep, electro vs. tech house” -www.flyglobalmusic.com

Luke Vibert – We Hear You (2009)


www.myspace.com/lukevibertacid