You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘trance-out’ category.

devendra

“We will admit to a bit of heightened curiosity about the ever-curious lo-fi, alt-folk, slightly loony “master of the idiotically cosmic” (Rolling Stone) Devendra Banhart. The few months of dating Natalie Portman, the new signing to major label Warner Brothers, the bizarre photo spreads…well, we’re in hippie-meets-hipster Devendra-land where just about anything is possible. Banhart’s seventh album What Will We Be arrives next week (October 27) and follows up his remarkable 2007 project Smokey Rolls Down Thunder Canyon, a disc that The Boston Globe described as a “trippy collection (that) spans Brazilian Tropicalia, ’60s psychedelia, classic rock, blissed-out pop, gospel…a ridiculous range of styles, but one that works under Banhart’s expansive, expressive umbrella.”

Recorded at a makeshift home-studio in California with Banhart and Paul Butler (Band of Bees) producing, What Will We Be features backup from Noah Georgeson (guitar and vocals), Greg Rogove (percussion), Luckey Remington (bass and vocals), and Rodrigo Amarante (guitar and vocals). Alternately hazy and dazy, the curiously affecting What Will We Be could be more aptly titled What Will Be Will Be as Banhart and crew careen from one style (and musical decade) to another, from Spanish lullaby to trippy folk to doo-wop chorus to piano bar sing-a-longs to ramshackle, 60’s rustic folk/rock all delivered with Banhart’s quavering croon in tow.” -press release

 

Devendra Banhart – What Will We Be (2009)

fuck you pitchfork ratings, who could give the new weezer a 4.5 and this a 4…? fucking corporate idiots… this owns, y2k+ Weezyer blows and retroactively almost ruins pinkerton for me…

Advertisements

lindstrom-prin-thomas-ii-cover
“Scandinavian disco kings Hans-Peter Lindstrm and Prins Thomas are set to release the follow up to their widely acclaimed eponymous debut this year.

The duo have had quite a journey since the release of their debut three years ago, with Thomas completing countless remixes and seeing his Full Pupp stable go from strength to strength, whilst Lindstrom went on to release his solo cosmic disco opus, Where I Go You Go Too. Both of them have been busy in the studio together during their time back in Oslo, and the fruits of their labour are now finally ready for release.

Whilst Lindstrom has always been one for using live instrumentation in the studio, Thomas’ gradual shift into using more and more live elements in his solo work has meant that their second collaborative album, entitled II, has a much looser, anic feel than the first record. The original intent stands, however, as they merge their italo, Krautrock and disco influences into a lush singular whole, imbuing them with their characteristically warm production sheen. Released just in time for summer, it looks as if the Nordic duo are looking to compete for part of your personal sunshine soundtrack this year.” -pressrelease

fuck-buttons-tarot-sport

brain-melting, spaceship-powering tribal tr(d)ance jams from the future / adrenaline pumping, ear purging slab of towering, pristine noise / swirling atmospherics and percussive gunfire / ‘rarely have two men sounded so much like the end of the world’ / new wave of intelligent, literate British pop music / iridescent synths, psychedelic drone, distorted vocals and tribal rhythms

HEALTH_GET_COLOR

forceful tribal drumming + end-of-days guitar shredding : huge walls of guitar-and-drum noise / scorched landscape / androgynous vocals / intricate synth patterns / brutal freakouts / / everything is fucked so it’s best we just rage until the sun comes up… post-apocalyptic nihilistic sound

emeralds

“Brand new full length from Cleveland’s Emeralds recorded Aug-Sept 2008. Proper follow up to their debut LP ‘Solar Bridge’, ‘EMERALDS’ takes the thick drone sound of that LP and transforms it into an even more abstract and strange place. Visual music that lifts the listener up and transports them through tubes of sound occasionally to be swept into the opposite direction by an unexpected entrance into another world entirely. An intense journey that drops you off in a place just beyond death.”

julian lynch   orangeyouglad
tropical, psychedelic, falsetto, lo-fi, experimental-pop, fuzzy folk, organ/synth drones, the psych guitars, wobbly electronics

“As a member of Ducktails, one would no doubt expect a rather wave washed approach to pop to seep into Julian Lynch’s solo work. As such Orange You Glad does trade in a certain gasoline haze that seems to coat much of the Duck’s work as well but Lynch sways further from the sunny veneer of coastal jams that flow from Mondanile’s guitar. Instead Lynch replaces the rays of euphoria with a calm melancholy overcast that feels as comforting as days spent watching rain on window panes from the dry comfort of a favorite chair. Softly psychedelic and bringing a subtle edge of comfort to the lo-fi landscape, Lynch’s songs hit like a feathered hammer just when you need it. Though barbs and edges of gritty guitar occasionally sneak their way through the one cushioning constant is Julian’s honey and heat voice that brings sweet relief every time. A welcome addition to the gauzy stable of summer records piling up on the tails of ’09.” -ravensingstheblues.blogspot.com

zombi spirit

“thematic instrumental rock
…epic builds and extra layers of instrumentation
any progressive rock band with synths” -theneedledrop, context-less quote snippets/adjective plunder

Zombi is a space rock duo from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consisting of Steve Moore on bass and synthesizers and Anthony Paterra on drums. The group makes use of looping to create multi-layered compositions. They have toured with Don Caballero, Isis, Orthrelm, The Psychic Paramount, Daughters, Red Sparowes, These Arms Are Snakes and Trans Am.

Maserati   Passages

“Maserati’s reputation varies depending on who you ask: They are either one of dance music’s most viscerally addictive live performers, or underground rock’s most ingenious hybrid of U2’s guitar heroics, Pink Floyd’s arena-ready psych rock, and Daft Punk’s head-slamming, club-burning rhythms.”

phaseone   thanksbutno

“On first listen, we assumed Phaseone was ensconced in L.A.’s hyper muggy beatfreak scene with dudes like Nosaj Thing, The Gaslamp Killer and Flying Lotus. But he’s actually from St. Louis, sharing little with those guys but a proclivity to making music that sounds like gumball asteroids falling from the sky. Lefse Records, the upstart imprint whose free compilation we shared a few weeks ago, is giving away his debut album Thanks But No Thanks; we’re passing it on because we think it’s excellent. You know those time lapse shots in Planet Earth where fungus grows out of stuff in a disturbingly beautiful way? This is like that happening in your head for forty minutes.” – rcrdlbl.com

felixskeleton

electro / electronica / techno
“I NEVER LIKED MUSIC UNTIL I HEARD MY OWN”

“…Needless to say, every one of my assumptions was shattered and surpassed on levels that I didn’t even have a clue existed. Not only has the young wrecka created an EP that embraces and fully displays the sounds of modern dance music, but he’s also made the art of innovation stylish once again. That is, where I expected to hear a collection of four songs that all resembled his (and everyone else’s) past work, I was startled to experience the charitable use of complex rhythms, character of sound ranging from his trademarked banger synth to lighter, poppier noises not dissimilar to that of Simian Mobile Disco, and elegant eight bar chord progressions that work hard to draw every last piece of energy possible out of those 24 bits. Long story short, it took Felix less than a minute to establish himself in my mind as far more than just a Reason remixer. Skeleton EP is wonderful. Felix is wonderful. Dancing is wonderful. Group hug.” – uhohdisco.com

Discodust : Felix Cartal Mixtape

felixcartal.com – step by step mixing tutorial for ‘Montreal Dreams’

www.myspace.com/felixcartal
riyl : bloody beetroots / justice / simian mobile disco


Felix Cartal – Skeleton EP (2009)